Day Sixteen of Noirvember: The Words of Noir

She goes where she wants to.

It’s a Noirvember tradition – a celebration of the memorable words of film noir. Enjoy!

“You’re trying to make me go soft. Well, you can save your oil. I don’t go soft for anybody.” Alan Ladd in This Gun For Hire (1942)

“If you want fresh air, don’t look for it in this town.” Anthony Caruso in The Asphalt Jungle (1950)

“I go where I want to, with anybody I want. I just happen to be that kind of girl.” Doris Dowling in The Blue Dahlia (1946)

“I’ve got a little room upstairs that’s too small for you to fall down in. I can bounce you off the walls, that way we won’t be wasting a lot of time while you get up off the floor.” William Bendix in The Glass Key (1942)

“I’ll get you eventually. If not tomorrow, next week. If not next week, next year. Time’s nothing in my life. It is in yours. Each minute’s an eternity to someone in your shoes.” Laird Cregar in I Wake Up Screaming (1942)

“You’d sell your own mother for a piece of fudge.”

“I’ll never think of our moments together without nausea.” Brian

Donlevy in Impact (1949)

“He was a lady killer. But don’t get any ideas – I ain’t no lady.” Myrna Dell in Nocturne (1946)

“I know you like a book, ya little tramp. You’d sell your own mother for a piece of fudge.” Sterling Hayden in The Killing (1956)

“Sure is remarkable how dying can make a saint of a man.” Allyn Joslyn in Moonrise (1949)

“I used to live in a sewer. Now I live in a swamp. I’ve come up in the world.” Linda Darnell in No Way Out (1950)

“How do you think I got where i did?”

“You’ll always be a two-bit cannon, and when they pick you up in the gutter dead, your hand will be in a drunk’s pocket.” Murvyn Vye in Pickup on South Street (1953)

“How do you think I got where I did? Not by being outsmarted by clucks like you.” Robert Ryan in The Racket (1951)

“Doesn’t it ever enter a man’s head that a woman can do without him?” Ida Lupino in Road House (1948)

“What do you want, Joe, my life story? Here it is in four words: big ideas, small results.” Barbara Stanwyck in Clash by Night (1952)

“I want what she’s got. All of it.”

“I like troubled times. They keep the police occupied.” Thomas Gomez in Singapore (1947)

“We’ve got a lot – but we haven’t got everything. I want what she’s got. All of it. I want her house, her name, her man. And I want them now. Tonight.” Hazel Brooks in Sleep My Love (1948)

“There’s one good thing in being a widow, isn’t there? You don’t have to ask your husband for money.” Frances Carson in Shadow of a Doubt (1943)

“The difference between the honest and the dishonest is a debatable line. We’re suckers if we don’t try to cram as much happiness as possible in our brief time, no matter how. Everybody breaks the law.” Joseph Cotten in The Steel Trap (1952)

“Young lady, there’s no overlooking the fact that murder is on our doorstep. But let’s not drag it into the living room.” Leo G. Carroll in Strangers on a Train (1951)

“Show me a guy who has feelings, and I’ll show you a sucker.” Frank Sinatra in Suddenly (1954)

Join me tomorrow for Day 17 of Noirvember!

~ by shadowsandsatin on November 16, 2018.

15 Responses to “Day Sixteen of Noirvember: The Words of Noir”

  1. Nothing like a good line. “If I was a ranch, they’d name me the Bar None.” Rita Hayworth in GILDA 1946

  2. Boy, could Sterling Hayden could do rough and mean !

  3. Ooh, this was fun.

    Made me think of “You’re as tough as a love song.” I think that’s how Conte put it in Somewhere in the Night.

  4. Love these!

  5. These are all great! I am partial to Mitchum’s lines in OUT OF THE PAST as well, particularly “I don’t want to die, baby, but if I have to, I’ma die last.”

  6. William Bendix is an absolute noir legend! Love him. Whenever he’s listed in the cast, I know it’s going to be a great movie.

  7. […] Day Sixteen: The Words of Noir […]

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